Synthetic rock drill lubricants

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Pneuma-Tool Inc.

The impact of heat on tool life

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Scorched seals, burnt pistons, heat fractured vanes, black carbonized parts

 

These are all indications of the tremendous heat buildup within percussive mining equipment. The color chart on the left side panel enables mechanics to estimate the temperature to which the parts they are replacing or repairing have been subjected. It is not uncommon for parts to turn blue after a hard service period, which indicates that they have been exposed to temperatures in the range of 550 - 575F.

 

Too bad that the conventional rock drill oil that you're using fails at just over 425F.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pneuma-Tool maintains an effective lubricating film at temperatures in excess of 550F,

and has been proven to extend service intervals on large gear - jumbos, vertical shaft

muckers, ITH drills, by 300% and more. Since overhauls can cost in excess of $20,000,

depending on the gear, it makes sense to extend the life of your gear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And don't look for help by switching to liquid rock drill greases. The photo below shows an overbased calcium sulfonate grease after a brief exposure to 300F. The liquid grease has separated into two phases. The center glob is the calcium component, and surrounding it is the mineral oil phase. Once the calcium component is repeatedly exposed to high temperatures, it can form hard deposits that can block lubricant flow, potentially resulting in premature equipment failure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Conventional rock drill oil at 430F - not much protection left here!

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Mechanics can estimate the temperature to which the parts they are repairing or replacing by the colour they have turned. A part that turned blue indicates that it has been exposed to 550 - 575 F.

Pneuma-Tool after several minutes exposure to temperatures as high as 569F.

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